Girl Sent Away

girlsentTerrified by his daughter’s increasingly reckless behavior, Toby Sedgwick takes a tough love approach and enrolls Ava in Mount Hope, a wilderness behavioral camp for troubled teens. Ava quickly realizes that the camp is little more than a prison, warehousing and abusing kids for their parents’ money. And after spending a disturbing weekend completing the parent portion of treatment, Toby knows it too. As Ava searches for a way out of Mount Hope, she struggles with memories of a family tragedy resurfacing. The pain of what happened to her mother and sister eight years earlier in Thailand can no longer be suppressed. As father and daughter fight to get back to each other, the truth may irrevocably tear them apart.

Girl Sent Away is an emotional page turner that explores the ways in which grief can tear families apart and love can triumph. –Ann Hood, author of The Knitting Circle

From Kirkus Reviews:
With its young heroine and sensitive examination of adolescents in crisis, Girl Sent Away would do well to also find a teen audience.

In Lynne Griffin’s new novel, Girl Sent Away, she takes on a topic that’s rarely discussed but which richly deserves our attention: the fear-based teenage boot camps that serve as a dark undercurrent to our domestic culture. In this book, Griffin explores that somber, frightening world, through the twinned journeys of a troubled teenage girl and her grieving father. This is a terrific and terrifying story, and one that should be told. Brava to Griffin for having the courage to do so. –Roxana Robinson, author of Cost and Sparta

This compelling novel takes us inside the lives of a girl and her father who fall prey to a horrific reality: a system of institutions that claims to treat trauma, but actually creates more of it. A must-read, especially for anyone whose life is touched by troubled teens. –Maia Szalavitz, author of Help at Any Cost: How the Troubled Teen Industry Cons Parents and Hurts Kids

Girl Sent Away is a harrowing tale of family and adolescence–of the things parents do to keep their children whole and the terrible mistakes they make along the way. With swift, clean prose, Lynne Griffin delves into the dark world of adolescent bootcamps, exposing a culture that damages those who are the most vulnerable. –Ivy Pochoda, author of Visitation Street